How well do you take criticism?

“Asking a working writer what he thinks about critics is like asking a lamppost how it feels about dogs.”

-Christopher Hampton

How do you respond to your critics? In the olden days, (before social media) writers only had to worry about negative reviews and criticism in newspapers and maybe on television and radio. The bad review was here one day and gone the next. You could dismiss the criticism with a sniff and “Critics! What do they know? My fans love my book!”

Today it’s more likely that your book could be criticized on Facebook and Twitter, on review blogs, and even on your your blog by fans and armchair critics alike. And these bad reviews can morph and linger on the net for eternity.

And that’s not necessarily bad.

Would you rather be criticized or ignored?

Everybody’s looking for attention online. Negative comments at least indicate that someone has seen your work. And it gives you, the author, the opportunity to respond to that person in a positive way and engage them in a conversation. You may not change their mind about your work, but having the dialogue in public may change other people’s minds or inspire them to read your book to see what the hoopla’s all about.

Remember, even bad publicity is good publicity.

How you respond could make all the difference.

To know what’s said about you online, use Google Alerts to send you email updates.

 

2 Responses

  • Transparency is the normal state of online communication. The biggest mistake companies make is to try to control the message.

  • Yes, I definitely agree. There is not available product in this world where you can’t find a review over the internet. Imagine how one thought of a person can actually reflect or affect one’s work. And as you said, having the dialogue in public may change other people’s minds or inspire them to read your book to see what the hoopla’s all about.

Comments are closed.